Books, Babes, and the Business: Billie Sue Mosiman

Celebrating Women in Fiction

blog header cwifBillie Sue Mosiman

Please tell us a little bit about yourself… (would you describe yourself primarily as a writer, publisher, editor, artist, radio talk show host…) Do you focus on a specific genre with your work?

I’m a writer. I write suspense and horror. I like the dark side.

Do you/Would you ever write under a male pseudonym? Why or why not?

I decided early on not to do that. I’d keep the Billie Sue, though it was so very Southern, and my husband’s last name. I have recently published three e-book short stories under a male pseudonym to test something out for myself. The male name gets no promotion, ever. No tweets, no Facebook links, no one knows his name, since he does not exist in reality. He has no track record, no other works attributed to him, no friends or family. Yet his little stories sold great at first and now they sell regularly, month after month. What does my experiment say to me? I’m not finished experimenting. As the three stories are zombie tales, I will want to write a crime story and another horror story of a different sort and see what happens with them. But I do find it strange a non-person, without promotion, without even a blog or a friend in the world, buried beneath hundreds of thousands of zombie books and stories, sells regularly. Is it the male name? Obviously so since I wrote the stories no differently than I write my stories under my own name. You decide.

Name a few of your favorite books/authors you’ve read recently:

Roh Morgan, Trent Zelazny, Michael Reaves, Joe McKinney, Lori Lopez, Kat Yares, Catie Rhodes, Franklin Wales, Stephen King.

Who has been the most influential female in your personal life and how have they shaped your work?

My grandmother, Naomi Robinson, was the most influential woman in my life. The only way she shaped my work is by always telling me, “You’re good as the best and better than the rest.” She gave me confidence.

If you could give your younger self one piece of advice relating to the business what would it be?

Don’t be too eager. Take more time. Hold publishers back from pushing too hard for the next book.

Do you have a current project or upcoming project you would like to tell us about?

Post Mortem Press will publish my next novel of suspense, THE GREY MATTER, in April or May this year. I’m very excited about it.

Where can we find you? 

banished cover

CLICK to BUY

*****

Twitter: @billiemosiman

 

Blog: http://www.peculiarwriter.blogspot.com

 

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Billie-Sue-Mosiman/e/B000AQ0Z5E

 

*****

 

bs mosimanAuthor of more than 60 books on Amazon, I am a thriller, suspense, and horror novelist, a short fiction writer, and a lover of words. In a diary when I was thirteen years old I wrote, “I want to grow up to be a writer.” It seems that was always my course. My books have been published since 1984 and two of them received an Edgar Award Nomination for best novel and a Bram Stoker Award Nomination for most superior novel. I have been a regular contributor to a myriad of anthologies and magazines, with more than 160 short stories published. My work has been in such diverse publications as Horror Show Magazine and Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. I taught writing for Writer’s Digest and for AOL online, and gave writing workshops locally in Texas. I was an assistant editor at a Houston literary magazine and co-edited several trade paperback anthologies with Martin Greenberg. My latest work in paperback and Kindle digital is SINISTER-Tales of Dread, a compilation of fourteen new short stories all written in 2013.

Recently I’ve sold short stories to the anthologies BETTER WEIRD edited by Paul F. Olson from Cemetery Dance, ALLEGORIES OF THE TAROT edited by Annetta Ribken, FRESH FEAR edited by William Cook, WRAPPED IN RED edited by Jennifer Greene, and SOMEONE WICKED edited by Weldon Burge. My latest suspense novel, THE GREY MATTER, will be published by Post Mortem Press by May 2014.

Books, Babes, and the Business: Leigh M. Lane

Celebrating Women in Fiction

blog header cwifLeigh M. Lane

Please tell us a little bit about yourself… (would you describe yourself primarily as a writer, publisher, editor, artist, radio talk show host…) Do you focus on a specific genre with your work?

I consider myself a horror novelist above all else, although some of my dystopian work straddles the fence between sci-fi and horror and I do also write short stories and screenplays. I write both psychological and paranormal horror, but I must say I prefer psychological monsters over the paranormal ones. I also do some editing.

Do you/Would you ever write under a male pseudonym? Why or why not?

I’ve considered it, but I don’t think it’s something I’d actually ever do. In our current climate, with so many women striving to prove themselves as valuable contributors to the genre, it would be counterproductive to give in to the mindset that only men can sell good horror. I would rather suffer the setbacks that come with being female than succeed on the basis that readers believe my work was written by a man. I am who I am, and I’m willing to do whatever it takes to prove I’m much more than just a pretty face.

Name a few of your favorite books/authors you’ve read recently:

The books I’ve enjoyed most recently are Deeply Twisted, a short story collection by Chantal Noordelos, Deathwatch, by Lisa Mannetti, and People Person, by Trent Zelazny. I recommend all three.

Who has been the most influential female in your personal life and how have they shaped your work?

Lisa Mannetti has by far been my greatest personal influence. She’s a neat woman and an exceptional horror writer. She has helped me to become more detail oriented in my writing, and she’s living proof that the glass ceiling that continues to hover over us is not shatterproof.

If you could give your younger self one piece of advice relating to the business what would it be?

Go back to school sooner than later. Take some time to learn your craft before jumping head-first into those shark-infested waters. Don’t be too eager to make a sale; don’t be afraid to reject that contract on the grounds of some iffy clauses. Above all else, have confidence in yourself!

Do you have a current project or upcoming project you would like to tell us about?

I have one novel I’m currently shopping and another I’m in the process of editing, and I also have an episodic novella series I’m hoping will find a good home sometime soon. My short story “Mused” is set to be published through Calidum Magazine sometime this month.

Where can we find you? 

Website: http://www.cerebralwriter.com

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Leigh-M.-Lane/e/B0055DSE6Y

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorLeighMLane

Twitter: @LeighMLane

llLeigh M. Lane has been writing for over twenty years. She has ten published novels and twelve published short stories divided among different genre-specific pseudonyms. She is married to editor Thomas B. Lane, Jr. and currently resides in Las Vegas, Nevada. Her traditional Gothic horror novel, Finding Poe, was a finalist in the 2013 EPIC Awards in horror.

Books, Babes, and the Business: Paula D. Ashe

Celebrating Women in Fiction

blog header cwifPaula D. Ashe

Please tell us a little bit about yourself… (would you describe yourself primarily as a writer, publisher, editor, artist, radio talk show host…)

Hello! I’m Paula. I’m a writer of dark fiction. I primarily write short stories, novellas, novels, and graphic novels.

Do you focus on a specific genre with your work?

Everything I write is dark in some vein. I used to be a real hard-ass about being known as a horror writer but I also write sci-fi, fantasy, and erotica, all with a dark bent.

Do you/Would you ever write under a male pseudonym? Why or why not?

I can’t say I NEVER would, but I haven’t so far. Male or female, I don’t really get the appeal of pseudonyms. Writing is hard as hell; I want people to recognize MY name on it! I have heard some women writers state that publishing under a male name has sometimes resulted in more sales and positive reviews. I would potentially publish something under a male pseudonym just to test the phenomenon.

Name a few of your favorite books/authors you’ve read recently:

I was REALLY impressed by Lily Childs’ “Cabaret of Dread Vol. 1” and Chantal Noordeloos’ “Deeply Twisted”. I also enjoyed Trent Zelazny’s “People Person” and the dark poetry of Roger Cowin and Vincenzo Bilof.

Who has been the most influential female in your personal life and how have they shaped your work?

Lame, I know, but that title has to go to my mom. She’s always been supportive even if she doesn’t fully understand (or like) everything I write.

If you could give your younger self one piece of advice relating to the business what would it be?

Finish everything you write. Embrace the philosophy of the shitty first draft. Not every piece you write deserves to be published, however, not every publication is deserving of your work.

Do you have a current project or upcoming project you would like to tell us about?

I’m on a writing hiatus until mid-May when the academic year ends. However, I’m looking forward to putting together an anthology over the summer that will include a sequel to “Mater Nihil” from FOUR GHOSTS.

Where can we find you?

four ghosts cover

CLICK TO BUY FOUR GHOSTS

Website: www.pauladashe.net

Twitter: @pauladashe

Facebook: facebook.com/pauladashe

Paula D. Ashe is a native Ohioan who came to Indiana in search of a flatter landscape. She is an English professor at Ivy Tech Community College and a PhD student in the American Studies program at Purdue University. A member of the Horror Writers Association, her award winning dark fiction has been published in Nexus Literary Magazine, the Indiana Science Fiction Anthology 2011, Indiana Crime 2012, and Indiana Horror 2012. She also has stories appearing in Serial Killers: Iterum and Hell. Her first supernatural novella “Mater Nihil”, was included in JWKFiction’s Four Ghosts anthology with William Cook, Murphy Edwards, and Christine Sutton. Paula lives with her wife and far too many pets in Northeast Indiana.